Walking on the streets


Graffiti Team 140 Ideas Illustrates Life on City Streets

Image

140 Ideas is a graffiti team made up of four Bulgarian street artists; Yeto, Teleto, Jermain and Flak. The four artists, whose styles are distinctly different from each others’, decided to collaborate and merge their artistic talents to create collage-style graffiti and street art murals. The group now travels together, creating art for graffiti competitions, galleries and commissions.

Image

In each piece of 140 Ideas’ graffiti, the different artists’ styles are apparent. Realism and surrealism merge with graphic designs and cartoon illustrations in a way that allows each art style to complement the others. The artistic collaboration allows each artist to express their personal style while building a finished product out of shared ideas, which is no mean feat. Artistic collaborations don’t always work out – especially with a large group of artists, yet with 140 Ideas; it appears that the graffiti team has found a way to create art that isn’t just not disjointed; there is a strong relationship between every element within the paintings.

Image

The team’s finished art works could be labelled as “pop surrealism” with its cartoonish, surrealistic styling and the frequent personification of animals, yet the inclusion of illustration and graphic design styles draw the team away from the label of pop surrealism. Together, they have created a style that doesn’t quite fit into any specific genre. Their style is completely their own, and therefore incredibly valuable to the art world at large.

Image

Join 140 Ideas on Facebook for updates from the artists, or take a look at their website for more graffiti and fine art pictures.

http://mayhemandmuse.com/graffiti-team-140-ideas-illustrates-life-on-city-streets/

Image

Image

Image

ImageImage

Anunțuri

Russian painting exhibition at MNAR


The National Museum of Art of Romania (MNAR) will be hosting thru April 28 the exhibition „Between East and West. Russian painting from the MNAR Collections Fund 16-20th century” at the Kretzulescu Halls. The exhibition is curated by Mariana Dragu, an expert at the MNAR European and Decorative Arts Section. For the first time in more than 20 years, the visiting public has the opportunity of seeing 59 Russian art works – 3 icons and 28 painting from the European and Decorative Arts Museum – significant works from the 16-20th century, which bring to public attention a lesser known yet valuable and carefully preserved and restored heritage over the past twenty years.   The work selection illustrates thru a couple of representative examples the development of a painting school which started out influenced by Byzantine art and then Western art and eventually brought deep changes to the European art   of the early 20th century.

Image

The icons on display, including Archangel Gavril (16th century, Novgorod School), are brilliant examples of the distinct style of Russian icon painters which evolved from a faithful reproduction of Byzantine art. Marked until the late 19th century by the influence of painters such as Theophanes the Greek or Andrei Rublev, Russian painting combines the old traditions and Western European influences, attaining some great technical refinement in the process.

Image

The 18th century Peter the Great-imposed reforms marked the beginning of modern Russia but also the decline of Byzantine style in Russian painting, whose effects translated into the setting up of the Russian easel art painting school and the first Western European art collections.   The new generation of Russian painters of the 19th century brings Russian art in sync with the European artistic trends and movements. They observe and depict in the most faithfully realistic style Russia’s nature and ordinary people (Autumn on the Volga by Konstantin Ivanovici Gorbatov, Landscape with People by Ilia Efimovici Repin, Caucasian Interior by N. Sacilov), taking inspiration from literature, folk customs and traditions in an attempt to depict the specificity of the “Russian spirit” (Russian Dance by Filip Andreevici Maliavin).

Image

Visiting program: Wednesday thru Sunday, 10.00 am – 6.00.

http://www.nineoclock.ro

Între Est şi Vest

Pictură rusă într-o cromatică vie şi strălucitoare

 Image

Muzeul Naţional de Artă al României invită publicul până pe 28 aprilie 2013 la expoziţia “Între Est şi Vest. Pictură rusă din patrimoniul MNAR”, secolele XVI – XX, deschisă în Sălile Kretzulescu. Curatorul expoziţiei este Mariana Dragu, specialist în cadrul Secţiei de Artă Europeană şi Decorativă a muzeului.

Image

Pentru prima dată după mai bine de 20 de ani, publicul are prilejul să se (re)întâlnească cu 59 de lucrări de artă rusă – 31 de icoane şi 28 de picturi din colecţiile Secţiei de Artă Europeană şi Decorativă a muzeului -, creaţii semnificative pentru intervalul cronologic dintre secolele XVI şi XX.

Image

Aceste lucrări readuc în atenţia publicului un patrimoniu valoros, mai puţin cunoscut, dar conservat şi restaurat cu grijă pe parcursul ultimelor două decenii.

Selecţia lucrărilor ilustrează, prin câteva exemple reprezentative, evoluţia unei şcoli de pictură care a început sub semnul artei bizantine, a continuat sub influenţa celei occidentale, ajungând la începutul secolului XX să contribuie la schimbarea profundă a artei europene.

Image

Icoanele prezente în expoziţie, precum “Arhanghelul Gavril” (sec. XVI, Şcoala din Novgorod), sunt exemple strălucite ale stilului inconfundabil al iconarilor ruşi, care evoluează de la fidelitatea faţă de arta bizantină, spre o mai mare fluiditate a desenului şi o cromatică vie şi strălucitoare. Marcată până spre sfârşitul secolului al XIX-lea de influenţa unor pictori precum Teofan Grecul şi Andrei Rubliov, pictura rusă îmbină vechile tradiţii cu influenţe europene occidentale, atingând un mare rafinament tehnic.

Image

Reformele impuse de Petru cel Mare în secolul al XVIII-lea declanşează modernizarea Rusiei, dar şi declinul stilisticii bizantine a artei icoanelor. Efectele în domeniul artei se manifestă prin înfiinţarea şcolii ruse de pictură de şevalet şi constituirea primelor colecţii de artă occidentală.

Image

Image

Noua generaţie de pictori ruşi aduce, în secolul al XIX-lea, sincronizarea artei ruse cu mişcările şi curentele artistice europene. Ei observă şi redau cât mai fidel, în stil realist, natura Rusiei şi înfăţişarea oamenilor simpli din popor (“Toamnă pe Volga” de Konstantin Ivanovici Gorbatov, “Peisaj cu personaje” de Ilia Efimovici Repin, “Interior caucazian” de N. Şacilov), inspirându-se din literatură, din tradiţiile şi obiceiurile populare în încercarea de a ilustra specificul „sufletului rus” (“Dans rusesc” de Filip Andreevici Maliavin).

Magdalena Popa Buluc

The Merry Cemetery of Sapanta


Small-town Romanian cemetery filled with darkly humorous gravestones

Image

When someone dies, their memory generally enters a kind of idealized state in the minds of those who loved them. Their flaws are forgiven and forgotten, and the way in which they passed (especially if it was unpleasant) often goes unspoken. Only the sweet stories about the person are retold. On their tombstone generalized niceties are written, often reduced to as little as „Rest in Peace.”

Image

Not so in the town of Săpânţa, Romania, where at the Cimitirul Vesel or „Merry Cemetery,” over 600 wooden crosses bear the life stories, dirty details, and final moments of the bodies they mark. Displayed in bright, cheery pictures and annotated with limericks are the stories of almost everyone who has died of the town of Săpânţa. Illustrated crosses depict soldiers being beheaded and a townsperson being hit by a truck. The epigraphs reveal a surprising level of truth. „Underneath this heavy cross. Lies my mother in law poor… Try not to wake her up. For if she comes back home. She’ll bite my head off.”

Stan Ioan Pătraş was born in Săpânţa in 1908, and at the age of 14 he had already begun carving crosses for the local cemetery. By 1935, Pătraş had begun carving clever or ironic poems — done in a rough local dialect — about the deceased, as well as painting the crosses with the deceased’s image, often including the way in which the individual died in the image.

Image

Stan Ioan Pătraş soon developed a careful symbolism in his work. Green represented life, yellow represented fertility, red for passion, black for death. The colors were always set against a deep blue, known as Săpânţa blue, which Pătraş believed represented hope, freedom, and the sky. Other symbolism — white doves for the soul, a black bird to represent a tragic or suspicious death — worked their way onto the crosses, as did Pătraş’s dark sense of humor.

Image

Săpânţa is a small town with few secrets, and often the dirty details of the deceased made it onto the crosses. One reads „Ioan Toaderu loved horses. One more thing he loved very much. To sit at a table in a bar. Next to someone else’s wife.” The deceased town drunk has a grave showing a black skeleton dragging him down while he swigs from a bottle, noted in his epitaph as „real poison.”

Image

Pătraş single-handedly carved, wrote poems for, and painted well over 800 hundred of these folk art masterpieces over a period of 40 years. It wasn’t until near the end of his life, in the early 1970s, that the merry cemetery, as the town has dubbed it, was discovered by the outside world, when a French journalist publicized it.

Image

Stan Ioan Pătraş died in 1977, having carved his own cross and left his house and work to his most talented apprentice, Dumitru Pop. Pop has since spent the last three decades continuing the work, carving the cemetery’s crosses, and has turned the house into the merry cemetery’s workshop-museum. Despite the occasionally dark comedy, or merely dark, tones of the crosses, Pop says no one has ever complained about the work.

„It’s the real life of a person. If he likes to drink, you say that; if he likes to work, you say that… There’s no hiding in a small town… The families actually want the true life of the person to be represented on the cross.”

Pop has one complaint about the work, that it can get repetitive. „Their lives were the same, but they want their epitaphs to be different.”

Image

http://atlasobscura.com/place/merry-cemetery

You’ll Die Laughing, if You’re Not Already Dead

By PETER S. GREEN  ( The New York Times )

SAPANTA, Romania – Death, when it visits this isolated town in a forgotten corner of Europe, comes laughing – in the guise, almost, of a comic book.

Image

 

While alive, the people of Sapanta’s 1,500 hearths eke out a rudimentary existence, tilling dark brown fields with horse-drawn plows, carding and spinning wool for thick blankets woven on burnished wooden looms, tending flocks of bleating sheep and saturnine cows.

Image

On Sundays they distill copper vats of fermented fruits for their potent liquor, tuica (pronounced TSUI-ka), attend Orthodox church services and gossip at the bus stop or the cafe dressed in colorful folk costumes.

But when a citizen of Sapanta dies, Dumitru Pop, a farmer, woodcarver and poet, gathers his notebook, chisels and paintbrushes and prepares to carve a poetic and pictorial homage of the deceased onto an oak grave marker in what villagers now call the Merry Cemetery, beside the Church of the Assumption.

Image

The 800 or so carvings – a festival of color – show the dead either in life or at the moment that death caught them, while the poems, mostly in a simple iambic tetrametre, are a final apology for an often ordinary life.

„The epitaphs,” explained Mr. Pop, „were conceived by the Master, a message from the dead man to the living world.” The Master was Ioan Patras Stan, a carver who scrawled his first verse on a tomb around 1935 and recorded the town in poetry until his death in 1977, when Mr. Pop, his apprentice, took over.

Image

The blue-painted oak slabs, decorated with floral borders and a riot of colors, fade and flake quickly in the harsh climate. The pictures are rudimentary, of women spinning yarn, of farmers on prized tractors, of a teacher at his desk or a musician playing the local three-stringed cello. Gheorghe Basulti, the butcher, is pictured chopping a lamb with a cleaver, a pipe at his lip. His life, which ended in 1939 at the age of 49, was apparently straightforward:

As I lived in this world,

I skinned many sheep

Good meat I prepared

So you can eat freely,

I offer you good fat meat

And to have a good appetite.

Ioan Toaderu loved horses, but, he says from beyond the grave:

One more thing I loved very much,

To sit at a table in a bar

Next to someone else’s wife.

There is the rare flash of anger, as with the epitaph for a 3-year-old girl whose name is no longer visible on the headstone but apparently perished in an auto accident.

Image

Burn in hell, you damn taxi

That came from Sibiu.

As large as Romania is

You couldn’t find another place to stop,

Only in front of my house to kill me?

Sometimes the headstones are a warning. Dumitru Holdis was overly fond of Sapanta’s moonshine. A black skeleton grabs his leg as he lifts a bottle to his lips, and his epitaph denounces tuica as „real poison.”

„What is on the stone is the truth,” said Mr. Pop, 46, sitting in the main room of Mr. Stan’s old wooden farmstead, where he now lives. In a small town, he said, „there are no secrets.”

Image

On Sundays, Mr. Stan walked about town eavesdropping on gossip, taking notes in a small book. Another source of inspiration is the wake, when friends and relatives gather to tell jokes and write a lengthy poetic tribute, called a vars.

Image

Where Mr. Stan was self-taught and never attended school, Mr. Pop is an avid reader of Romanian literature and a great fan of the nation’s 19th-century poet Mihai Eminescu. Mr. Pop said that his own poems, while keeping touches of the local dialect, are much closer to literary language than Mr. Stan’s.

Image

The only problem, said Mr. Pop, is that in a small town, there is not much to differentiate the routines of the inhabitants. „Their lives were the same but they want their epitaphs to be different,” he said.

In the summer months after he has planted his nine acres with horses borrowed from a neighbor, he begins to carve the grave marker.

Image

Wood is a natural choice in a town where many houses are still made from logs neatly dovetailed and the roofs are sheathed in wooden shingles. Mr. Pop chooses an oak from nearby forests and fells it himself.

The carving is done with hand chisels at a bench in an open-sided room alongside the cowshed. A table saw for slicing planks is his only concession to progress since the Master died. Paints are still a problem – those who can afford it hire Mr. Pop’s three apprentices to repaint the grave markers of their relatives every 15 years or so. The living room of Mr. Stan’s old house is a gallery of his carvings – and polychrome pinups of his favorite folk musicians.

Until last year, when a phone call came from the museum in the county seat of Sighetu Marmatiei, there were also portraits of Romania’s brutal Communist dictator, Nicolae Ceausescu, and his equally reviled wife, Elena. Mr. Pop says he has the portraits locked away, awaiting the next change in Romania’s political winds. „In time, they will come back on the wall,” Mr. Pop said, reflecting the accumulated wisdom of Eastern Europeans who have seen many isms prevail over the last century.

Image

In fact, the Communists embraced the Merry Cemetery. On one grave marker sits a Communist official named Ioan Holdis, a seal with the hammer and sickle in his hand and a Bible open on the table before him. The verse says:

As long as I lived, I loved the Party

And all my life I tried to help the people.

Image

Ethnologists say Sapanta’s laughing cemetery is likely a reflection of attitudes that come from the time of the Dacians, early inhabitants of Romania, and have been passed down in folklore ever since. The historian Herodotus said the Dacians were fearless in battle and went laughing to their graves because they believed they were going to meet Zalmoxis, their supreme god.

Image

The Rev. Grigore Lutai, Sapanta’s Orthodox priest, concurs. „The people here don’t react to death as though it were a tragedy,” he said. „Death is just a passage to another life.”

Read more articles about Romania at

www.RomaniaTourism.com/Romania-in-the-Press.html

 

Biserici uitate din Transilvania (Forgotten wooden churches in Transylvania – Cluj county)


The wooden churches of the region that still stand were built starting in the 17th century all the way to 19th century. Some were erected on the place of older churches. They are a response to a prohibition against the erection of stone Orthodox churches. The churches are made of thick logs, some are quite small and dark inside but several of them have impressive measures. They are painted with rather „naive” Biblical scenes, mostly by local painters. The most characteristic features are the tall tower above the entrance and the massive roof that seems to dwarf the main body of the church.

Bisericile de lemn din Transilvania fac parte din familia de biserici de lemn românești. În Transilvania, inclusiv Maramureșul și Crișana, se mai păstrează aproximativ 650 de biserici de lemn, jumătate din numărul celor existente după primul război mondial. Bisericile de lemn rămase în Transilvania domină patrimoniul cultural și istoric imobil al românilor din aceste părți. Bisericile de lemn au o valoare identitară inegalabilă și inestimabilă pentru românii ardeleni. Ele sunt documente palpabile și grăitoare ale realităților istorice, sociale și culturale din trecutul acestei regiuni.

Numărul mare de biserici de lemn împrăștiate prin văile și pe dealurile Transilvaniei au pus și pun în continuare la grea încercare cercetarea românească. Din acest motiv bisericile de lemn din Transilvania au fost studiate pe regiuni istorice sau administrative. Nici până astăzi nu există un studiu amplu și competent care să cuprindă întreaga Transilvanie, pentru simplul motiv că, după un secol de cercetare, nu s-a terminat inventarierea lor iar materialul adunat este dispersat și neomogen.

Antas

Image

Image

Image

Blidăreşti

Image

Image

Calna

Image

Image

Image

Ciubăncuţa

Image

Image

Cremenea

Image

Image

Image

Gârbăul Dejului

Image

Image

Image

Leurda

Image

Image

Nima

Image

Pintic

Image

Sălişca

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

 Valea Căşeiului

Image

Image

Foto: wikipedia si wikimedia

Biserici uitate: „Sfinţii Arhangheli Mihail şi Gavril” din Strâmbu (Cluj)


Este deja cunoscut că mai bine de o sută de biserici din judeţul nostru, făcând parte din patrimoniul naţional, au ajuns într-o stare gravă de degradare. Cu vârste care coboară până în secolele XVI şi XVII, toate au nevoie de reparaţii urgente, chiar dacă „restaurarea lor va dura între 10-15 ani, necesitând resurse financiare consistente” după cum aprecia directorul Centrului Judeţean pentru Conservarea şi Promovarea Culturii Tradiţionale (CJCPCT), Tiberiu Groza.

Image

Sfinţii Arhangheli, nu interesează pe nimeni

„Bisericile din lemn sunt ca bisericile saşilor. Ca şi cum şi românii ar fi plecat”. Aserţiunea îi aparţine academicianului Marius Porumb, iar amărăciunea căreia îi dau glas aceste cuvinte am simţit-o din plin la Strâmbu, în decembrie anul trecut. Deşi mai fusesem în acest sat, aparţinând comunei Chiuieşti, pentru prima dată am intrat în biserica „Sfinţii Arhangheli Mihail şi Gavril” sau „biserica de pe deal”, cum îi spun localnicii.

Image

Ridicată în piatră în secolul XVII şi „reînnoită”, în 1764, prin grija monahului înnobilat Filip Pahomie Georgiu din Strâmbu (Filip Pachonius György – nobilis de Horgospatak, în opisurile vremii), biserica se află pe noua listă a monumentelor istorice sub codul LMI: CJ-II-m-B-07770. Că se află, e bine, atâta doar că acest lucru nu foloseşte la nimic. Cel puţin momentan. Pentru că nimeni nu se mai îngrijeşte de monumentul uitat şi nici nu este interesat ca acesta să fie inclus într-un circuit turistic, cu sau fără frunze, alături de biserica veche din incinta Mănăstirii Căşiel, de exemplu, ctitorită de acelaşi Pahomie Georgiu.

Image

Zona, în sine, este de tip B, adică de interes local, nu de „interes naţional”. Aşa mi s-a spus. Ca să ajungi la biserica – excelent poziţionată, de altfel – trebuie să treci printr-un simulacru de drum noroios şi printre câteva morminte din cimitirul de pe deal. Oricine poate intra şi ieşi din edificiul neîncuiat, care mai păstrează în interior câteva icoane, inscripţii şi rămăşiţe din frescele care se încăpăţânează să nu se lase şterse de tot. Deşi vântul şuieră toamna prin geamurile sparte, iar ploaia intră în voie prin găurile din acoperiş.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Asemenea multor alte cazuri de pictură ţărănească din bisericile vechi din Transilvania, tehnica fragilă cu liant organic, aplicată într-un microclimat cu precipitaţii abundente şi mari variaţii termice, stă la baza degradărilor grave pentru a căror remediere nu există un program de ansamblu coerent şi de lungă durată.

Grandomania omoară bisericile săteşti

Interesant că, până în anii ’70 biserica a fost funcţională. Adevărat, prea mică, dar utilizabilă totuşi, un loc de smerenie, intim legată de sufletul sătenilor. Biserica nouă „Naşterea Sf. Ioan Botezatorul, a fost construită în perioada 1970-1975 prin stăruinţa preotului Alexandru Iosip, şi a fost sfinţită în 1977 de către Arhiepiscopul Teofil Herineanu, al Vadului, Feleacului şi Clujului. Nimic rău în construirea unei biserici noi, dimpotrivă, era chiar necesară, atâta doar că cea veche a fost dată uitării, în loc să fie conservată cu grijă, aşa cum se întâmplă în ţările civilizate.

Din păcate, în absenţa unei educaţii şi a unor măsuri care să susţină conservarea patrimoniului rural în ansamblul său, bisericile vechi, care sunt o formă de exprimare a identităţii naţionale, şi sunt reprezentative pentru anumite comunităţi sau perioade istorice, vor fi în continuare uitate, demolate şi înlocuite de construcţii noi. Înlocuite de câte un lăcaş de cult echivalent cu zero din punct de vedere istoric şi arhitectural, dar musai mai înalt, mai mare şi mai modern decât cel din satul vecin. Teoretic, pentru că în realitate aproape toate bisericile săteşti de zid ridicate în ultimii ani, arată la fel. Două sau trei tipuri de construcţii, care se repetă la nesfârşit, eventual cu îmbunătăţiri gen termopane, acoperişul de tablă zincată sau turnuleţe precum palatele ţigăneşti. Mai mult, după cum casele au deschis larg uşa, lăsând să pătrundă în interiorul lor produse de un gust artistic mai mult decât îndoielnic, microbul respectivei denaturări a bunului gust nu a ocolit nici sfintele lăcaşuri. Ba, uneori, tocmai aici s-a făcut mai remarcat. În astfel de biserici frapează numărul de elemente decorative care nu-şi au rostul iar impresia pe care o lasă este de „expoziţie cu produse artizanale”. Cât mai multe, într-un spaţiu cât mai restrâns.

Image

Aşteptând o soartă mai bună

Între timp, treptat, treptat, vechea bisericuţă din Strâmbu, se îndreptă spre ruină. În pofida faptului că din punct de vedere arhitectonic, este una din puţinele biserici din piatră, cu contraforturi, de pe Valea Someşului, autorităţile locale, Ministerul Culturii şi Cultelor, instituţiile bisericeşti etc. dau din umeri.

Image

Părăsită, cu o cruce masivă sprijinită de perete, biserica din Strâmbu, alături de celelalte din zonă, rezumă un genocid cultural care se petrece sub ochii noştri. Şi-atunci, paralela între bisericile saşilor, care se năruie din lipsa credincioşilor care să le poarte de grijă, şi cele vechi, româneşti, devine de-a dreptul dureroasă. Fiindcă saşii au plecat, dar românii nu. Românii au plecat doar de lângă vechile biserici, în care s-au rugat părinţii şi bunicii lor, lăsându-le pradă ploilor, în aşteptarea unor reparaţii menite să le salveze şi, odată cu ele, coordonatele vieţuirii noastre pe aceste meleaguri. Asta dacă mai putem crede în finaluri fericite.

Magdalena Vaida

Un articol pe care l-am publicat in Faclia (www.ziarulfaclia.ro). Degeaba!Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Personala Mihai Sârbulescu la Galeria „Frezia”


Galeria de Artă „Frezia” din Dej găzduieşte în perioada 28 iulie – 24 august, expoziţia de pictură aparţinând lui Mihai Sârbulescu, unul dintre cei mari valoroşi artişti plastici români contemporani. Expoziţia – deschisă de criticul de artă Oliv Mircea şi părintele prof. dr. Ioan Bizău – aduce în faţa publicului dejean o selecţie din lucrările maestrului, lucrări ce posedă o expresivitate plastică convingătoare prin ele însele şi în care, linia şi culoarea, subliniind particularităţile de stil şi viziune ale artistului, recompun o lume aflată într-o permanentă vibraţie poetică.

Absolvent al Institutul de Arte Plastice „Nicolae Grigorescu” Bucuresti, secţia pictură, clasa prof. Marius Cilievici (1981), Mihai Sârbulescu este doctor al Universităţii Naţionale de Arte Bucureşti, iar din 2004, cadru didactic asociat al acesteia, fiind de asemenea membru UAP, membru co-fondator al grupului Prolog (1985) şi autorul volumelor „Despre ucenicie” (Editura „Anastasia”, Bucureşti, 2002) şi „Jurnal” (Editura „Ileana”, Bucureşti, 2004).

Începând cu 1982, expune constant în cadrul unor expoziţii personale şi de grup, atât în ţară – Bucureşti, Timişoara, Bistriţa, Sibiu, Braşov, Arad, Baia Mare, Cluj-Napoca, Târgu Jiu  – cât şi în străinătate: Germania, SUA, Italia, Franţa, Cehia, Polonia, Cipru, Bulgaria, Ungaria, Austria, Portugalia, Elveţia, Olanda etc. Talentul şi opera artistului au fost recunoscute de-a lungul anilor prin numeroasele premii şi distincţii care i-au fost acordate, între acestea numărându-se şi Ordinul Serviciul Credincios în grad de cavaler.

M. Vaida